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Thursday, September 22, 2011

Dream Job and Banned Books Week

This is pretty much my dream job...

http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/columns/next-steps/broadcast-collaboration

Even though we love where we are, Jason and I both still miss public radio at times, and to be a librarian at NPR...well, that would just be the perfect combination, right?

I also get a little excited thinking about embedded librarians and the possibilities for that--especially in classrooms. It's probably going to look different for every library and school, but the trend seems to be going that way--if not actual embedding, then at least librarians getting out of the (physical) library.

In other news, just as a reminder, Banned Books Week starts Saturday. What are you guys reading (or championing)?

No banned books on my list this year, but I am still enjoying Her Fearful Symmetry and Cinderella Ate My Daughter. Can't say I'm enjoying Strategy and the Business Landscape quite as much, but it is pretty informative.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Classes, Quick Links, and an Update

I can't remember if I updated what classes I'm taking this semester, so here they are just for the record: Qualitative Research, Strategic Decision Making (a Management class), and our required doctoral seminar, technically a one-hour class that's turning out to have the work load of a three-hour. 


I could go on for awhile about that (as the husband can attest), but enough with the complaints. 


It's been awhile since I've updated links, too! So long that some I had slated to post were related to Tuscaloosa's devastating tornado and the UA-SLIS response to that. We'll just sum those up by saying they--and the community and state as a whole--were amazing. Couldn't be more proud to be from Alabama.


Meanwhile, this article about students and research generated a lot of discussion here in Texas--at least at my school and the library where I work


Speaking of my library, I want one of these mystery paper sculptures to show up here!


Moving on, I just finished reading Anne Lamott's Grace Eventually, and I liked this quote: 
I see [librarians] as healers and magicians. Librarians can tease out of inarticulate individuals enough information about what they are after to lead them on the path of connection. They are trail guides through the forest of shelves and aisles--you turn a person loose who has limited skills, and he'll be walloped by the branches. But librarians match up readers with the right books.
She talked a lot about the downside to downsizing libraries, and here's another author concerned about that trend


Meanwhile, Jessamyn West (saw her speak at TechNet this summer--holla!) and others discussed whether school librarians are expendable as well.


I'm still dreaming of getting a reader like the iPad, Kindle, or Nook, and articles like this don't help!


And, just for funsies, Gotta Be Scholar. Didn't BYU do another well-produced "the library is cool" video a year or so ago? (Are you ever like me and too lazy to Google something like that?)


Finally, I'm working on finishing Her Fearful Symmetry, which will be my last "official" review book (about a year after I said I was going to stop doing these, right? ha). After that, you'll see some changes to the ol' blog, but I'll keep you posted as that goes along.


Happy reading!

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Bringing Up Girls

As my pal Shelley (whose own little girl is due any day now) said recently, "It's time to stop reading about what I'm going through [pregnancy books] and start figuring out what to do when the baby gets here."

Cue the parenting books.
I'd heard good things about James Dobson's Bringing Up Girls, so I started with it. But I knew within the first couple of chapters that I would have to grit my teeth through the rest.

Three things I took issue with:

-The absence of any acknowledgement of work-at-home (or stay-at-home) dads. It hit two options: mom making the sacrifices by giving up her career or leaving Baby Girl with a trusted friend or relative. (day care = bad in this book) This one didn't bug me too much, though. I hear it's a rising trend for dads to be the primary caretaker (and my amazing husband will be one of those next year), but it does still seem to be somewhat uncommon. At least Dobson didn't ream it; it just didn't seem to be on his radar.

-Also, I was bothered by the lauding of the princess culture. He seemed to think it was all fun and innocence when there are actually quite a few troubling issues (at least to me) about it. Specifically, the focus on outer beauty, the belief that a happy ending depends on getting your prince, and ohmygoodness the materialism (especially if we're talking specifically about the Disney princess culture). I'm now reading Cinderella Ate My Daughter by Peggy Orenstein, and this one seems to be more in my line of thinking. No idea, though, how to completely shield Baby Girl from all of that. She's never allowed to go shopping with us? No tv, movies, or internet allowed? Limited (if any) social interaction with other kids at all? That sounds about right. ;)


-Finally, I didn't really like the book because it perpetuated one of my pet peeves: gender stereotypes. I'm not getting into a theology discussion here; I'm talking about personality traits that people often assign to men and women. Men are physical, blunt, uncommunicative, logical, while women are nurturing, emotional, sensitive, talkative, and relational. You can look no farther than my husband and me to see that this is just not always the case. In fact, if we're to believe the Myers-Briggs people, 20-30 percent of women are "thinkers" and vice versa (that same percentage of men would be classified as "feelers").

But here's why I kept reading.

Because even if I am not talkative, emotional, or sensitive, my daughter just might be, and I want to know how to deal with her on a level that she understands and appreciates. I want to be able to speak her love language (if we're still talking books here).

Also, despite the issues I had with some of his conclusions, Dobson does raise some valid concerns about morality, oversexualization in the culture, and appropriate use of technology, and he gives some great general parenting advice about communication and quality time with kids.

So I guess Bringing Up Girls was kind of like all parenting advice you get--take what you like and what you think will work for your family, let the rest go.

Thoughts? Recommendations? Feel free to dispense your own advice because we've got a pretty steep learning curve ahead. :)

Bringing Up Girls

As my pal Shelley (whose own little girl is due any day now) said recently, "It's time to stop reading about what I'm going through [pregnancy books] and start figuring out what to do when the baby gets here."

Cue the parenting books.

I'd heard good things about James Dobson's Bringing Up Girls, so I started with it. But I knew within the first couple of chapters that I would have to grit my teeth through the rest.

Three things I took issue with:

-The absence of any acknowledgement of work-at-home (or stay-at-home) dads. It hit two options: mom making the sacrifices by giving up her career or leaving Baby Girl with a trusted friend or relative. (day care = bad in this book) This one didn't bug me too much, though. I hear it's a rising trend for dads to be the primary caretaker (and my amazing husband will be one of those next year), but it does still seem to be somewhat uncommon. At least Dobson didn't ream it; it just didn't seem to be on his radar.

-Also, I was bothered by the lauding of the princess culture. He seemed to think it was all fun and innocence when there are actually quite a few troubling issues (at least to me) about it. Specifically, the focus on outer beauty, the belief that a happy ending depends on getting your prince, and ohmygoodness the materialism (especially if we're talking specifically about the Disney princess culture). I'm now reading Cinderella Ate My Daughter by Peggy Orenstein, and this one seems to be more in my line of thinking. No idea, though, how to completely shield Baby Girl from all of that. She's never allowed to go shopping with us? No tv, movies, or internet allowed? Limited (if any) social interaction with other kids at all? That sounds about right. ;)


-Finally, I didn't really like the book because it perpetuated one of my pet peeves: gender stereotypes. I'm not getting into a theology discussion here; I'm talking about personality traits that people often assign to men and women. Men are physical, blunt, uncommunicative, logical, while women are nurturing, emotional, sensitive, talkative, and relational. You can look no farther than my husband and me to see that this is just not always the case. In fact, if we're to believe the Myers-Briggs people, 20-30 percent of women are "thinkers" and vice versa (that same percentage of men would be classified as "feelers").


But here's why I kept reading.

Because even if I am not talkative, emotional, or sensitive, my daughter just might be, and I want to know how to deal with her on a level that she understands and appreciates. I want to be able to speak her love language (if we're still talking books here).

Also, despite the issues I had with some of his conclusions, Dobson does raise some valid concerns about morality, oversexualization in the culture, and appropriate use of technology, and he gives some great general parenting advice about communication and quality time with kids.

So I guess Bringing Up Girls was kind of like all parenting advice you get--take what you like and what you think will work for your family, let the rest go.

Thoughts? Recommendations? Feel free to dispense your own advice because we've got a pretty steep learning curve ahead. :)

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Recommended Reading?

So, what are some good baby-raising sources?

On the list so far, we have Bringing Up Girls by James Dobson and, um, the seven seasons of Gilmore Girls.

Help a blogger out! ;)

So much for mother's intuition...


Read from the beginning...